Tag Archives: pineapple juice

A New Invention – Lime Strength Pineapple Juice

In Dave Arnold’s ‘Liquid Intelligence’, he talks about about a method he uses to increase the acidity of orange juice to make it act as a substitute for lemon or lime as the sour component in a cocktail. This got me thinking about other juices that might be suitable for the same treatment. Pineapple juice seemed like a likely candidate, as it’s got some acidity already, and conveniently pineapples have just gone on sale here.

I did some research on the acid content of pineapple juice, wading through various industrial science papers from the pineapple industry, and, as best as I can determine, pineapple juice has an acid content of about 1.2 g/100ml, of which 87% is citric acid and 13% is malic acid (the same acids as in lime juice, just in different proportions).

I picked up a small pineapple, peeled and cored it, and threw it in a blender. Then I strained it and squeezed it through a nut-milk bag to get rid of as much pulp as possible. My final yield was 400 ml of juice. I knew I wanted a final acid content of 6 g/100ml, so I needed to add 4.8 grams of acid per 100 ml, or 19.2 grams acid total for the 400 ml. I went with a mix of 15.6 g citric acid and 3.6 g malic acid (about 4:1, part way between the acidic composition of lime juice and that of pineapple juice). Then I stirred until dissolved.

Based on the combination of acids, I figured the taste would work best as a substitute for lime. I substituted the juice for lime juice in a gimlet and in a daiquiri, and both were spectacular. A couple nights later, at the local cocktail book club meeting (where we were, not coincidentally, discussing ‘Liquid Intelligence’) we tried it in a Last Word. Aside from being a bit to sweet (the pineapple juice has about 8 times the sugar as lime juice), this was also quite good. The only recipe I’ve found it to be an unsatisfying substitute for lime juice is a margarita.

Next time I’m going to try getting the acid ratio a little closer to the 7:1 ratio of pineapple juice (so 4.2 g citric and 0.6 g malic per 100ml) to see how that affects the flavor. My guess is that this will make it a better candidate for replacing lemon than lime.

Lime Strength Pineapple Juice
Peel and core a pineapple. Blend and strain, or run through a juicer. For every 100 ml of juice extracted add:
3.9 g citric acid
0.9 g malic acid
Stir until dissolved. Refrigerate, keeps at least a week, but the flavour is best right away. Use in place of lime in any recipe, but reduce the amount of simple syrup or liqueur or it will be a bit too sweet.

Pineapple Gimlet

Pineapple Gimlet
60 ml gin
25 ml lime strength pineapple juice
20 ml simple syrup
Shake with ice. Strain into a cocktail glass.

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Port Maria

Port Maria
Port Maria
1½ ozs. light rum
3/4 oz. pineapple juice
½ oz. lemon juice
1 teaspoon Falernum
Grated nutmeg
Shake rum, pineapple juice, lemon juice and Falernum well with ice. Strain into prechilled cocktail glass. Sprinkle nutmeg on top.

For this recipe I used Bacardi silver and homemade Falernum.

This one didn’t do much for me. It was okay, but it didn’t quite come together. The big problem was not enough falernum to really make itself known. I then tried it with different proportions (3:2:1:1), and it was excellent! The nutmeg and falernum combo is wonderful, and both work really well with the pineapple.

I’ve only found a few versions of this online, and none in any of my other books, so I’m not sure exactly when this drink originated. Based on the tiki-esque nature of it, though, I’d guess the 40s or 50s.

This post is part of my project to make, and where possible improve upon, all the cocktails in “Playboy’s Host and Bar Book” from 1971.

Pago Pago

Pago Pago

Pago Pago
1½ ozs. golden rum
½ oz. fresh lime juice
½ teaspoon green Chartreuse
¼ teaspoon white crème de cacao
½ oz. pineapple juice
Shake well with ice. Strain into prechilled cocktail glass. Pineapple comes through beautifully.

For this recipe I used Ron de Jeremy, Meaghers crème de cacao, and canned pineapple juice.

Just based on the ingredients I figured this would be a very tasty drink. But unfortunately the Playboy Host & Bar Book cuts the key flavour ingredients down to a sixth of their amounts in the traditional recipe, and it just ends up bland.

The original recipe, as recovered from 1940’s The How and When by Jeff “Beachbum” Berry uses ounces instead of teaspoons for the Chartreuse and cacao, as well as muddling fresh pineapple chunks instead of using pineapple juice. I tried a second one using the classic proportions (but still using canned pineapple juice, since I didn’t have an fresh pineapple handy) and it was a huge improvement.

This post is part of my project to make, and where possible improve upon, all the cocktails in “Playboy’s Host and Bar Book” from 1971.